Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

In $100M Colorado River Deal, Water and Power Collide

Via Aspen Public Radio, a look at how – in a proposed $100 million Colorado River deal – water and power collide: Colorado’s Glenwood Canyon is as busy as it is majestic. At the base of its snowy, near-vertical walls, the narrow chasm hums with life. On one side, the Colorado River tumbles through whitewater rapids. […]

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As Use of A.I. Soars, So Does the Energy and Water It Requires

Via Yale e360, a look at how fenerative artificial intelligence uses massive amounts of energy for computation and data storage and billions of gallons of water to cool the equipment at data centers. Now, legislators and regulators — in the U.S. and the EU — are starting to demand accountability: Two months after its release […]

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Project Octopus: International Partnership Linking Desalination and Carbon Capture

Via Aquatech Trade, a report on a new innovative desalination and carbon capture project: A new partnership will co-develop the first fully integrated water management and carbon dioxide removal system at a desalination plant in South Korea. Uniting climate and water for “world first” pilot A new pilot project in South Korea will use atmospheric […]

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Water For Hydrogen Production

Via China Water Risk, a report on the most and least water-efficient clean hydrogen production technologies, we talk to Luo, Director at Bluerisk and co-author of the report ‘Water for Hydrogen Production’: In December 2023 during COP28, The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and Bluerisk published a new report “Water for Hydrogen Production”. The report, which is the first of its […]

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San Diego Could Be First to Float Solar on Drinking Water

Via Voice of San Diego, an article on how one southern California water authority is proposing to float solar panels on its reservoir but some in the community feel it’s being rushed:  A south San Diego water district is thinking about powering itself with energy from the sun.  Leaders at Sweetwater Authority, which serves National City, […]

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Proposed Hydrogen Pipeline Could Diminish Navajo Water Supply

Via Navajo-Hopi Observer, a look at how a  proposed hydrogen pipeline could diminish Navajo water supply: Jessica Keetso remembers running through puddles with her cousins during the monsoon seasons of her childhood in the Black Mesa (Dził Yijiin) region on the Navajo Nation in Northeastern Arizona. Their muddied legs would ache after a day’s worth […]

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About This Blog And Its Author
As the scarcity of water and energy continues to grow, the linkage between these two critical resources will become more defined and even more acute in the months ahead.  This blog is committed to analyzing and referencing articles, reports, and interviews that can help unlock the nascent, complex and expanding linkages between water and energy -- The Watergy Nexus -- and will endeavor to provide a central clearinghouse for insightful articles and comments for all to consider.

Educated at Yale University (Bachelor of Arts - History) and Harvard (Master in Public Policy - International Development), Monty Simus has held a lifelong interest in environmental and conservation issues, primarily as they relate to freshwater scarcity, renewable energy, and national park policy.  Working from a water-scarce base in Las Vegas with his wife and son, he is the founder of Water Politics, an organization dedicated to the identification and analysis of geopolitical water issues arising from the world’s growing and vast water deficits, and is also a co-founder of SmartMarkets, an eco-preneurial venture that applies web 2.0 technology and online social networking innovations to motivate energy & water conservation.  He previously worked for an independent power producer in Central Asia; co-authored an article appearing in the Summer 2010 issue of the Tulane Environmental Law Journal, titled: “The Water Ethic: The Inexorable Birth Of A Certain Alienable Right”; and authored an article appearing in the inaugural issue of Johns Hopkins University's Global Water Magazine in July 2010 titled: “H2Own: The Water Ethic and an Equitable Market for the Exchange of Individual Water Efficiency Credits.”