As Warming and Drought Increase, A New Case for Ending Big Dams

Via Yale’s e360, an article on how climate change, bringing dried-up reservoirs and increased methane releases, should spell the end of big hydropower: s the hydroelectric dam industry tries to reposition itself as a climate change solution, more and more evidence shows that climate change actually undermines the case for hydro dams. Gone are the […]

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Europe’s Largest Floating Solar Farm Underway in Netherlands

Via Bloomberg, an article on a new floating solar farm in the Netherlands: German renewable energy developer Baywa r.e. has begun constructing what will be the largest floating solar farm outside of China. The 27-megawatt Bomhofsplas solar farm is set to include 73,000 solar panels on a sandpit lake in Zwolle in the Netherlands, the company said […]

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Solar Panels to Be Installed Above California Canals

Via EcoWatch, a report on a project to install solar arrays over two irrigation canals in California: Solar panels are coming to two California canals. The “Project Nexus” follows research from the University of California-Merced finding substantial benefits for water quality and delivery, in addition to the benefits of renewable power generation. This first-of-its-kind pilot project will install solar […]

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Nepal Begins Hydropower Export to India

Via The Diplomat, an article on Nepal’s efforts to balance its need for Chinese investment and the Indian market to tap the full potential of its hydropower sector: In November 2021, India threw open its doors to purchase of Nepal’s electricity. This is an important milestone for Nepal as it the first time that the […]

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U.S. Hydropower Generation To Decline 14% In 2021 Amid Drought

Via Renewable Energy World, a report on a forecast decrease in US hydropower generation: In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecasts that electricity generation from U.S. hydropower plants will be 14% lower in 2021 than it was in 2020. This is a result of “extreme and exceptional” drought conditions […]

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The American West Is Running Out of Water—and Big Oil Can Help Fix It

Via Fast Company, commentary on the potential to repurpose our oil and gas infrastructure to do something good for the planet: transport water to the parched West: We will eventually stop burning fossil fuels. The question isn’t if oil and gas fades from the picture, but whether it can happen quickly enough to stave off environmental […]

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About This Blog And Its Author
As the scarcity of water and energy continues to grow, the linkage between these two critical resources will become more defined and even more acute in the months ahead.  This blog is committed to analyzing and referencing articles, reports, and interviews that can help unlock the nascent, complex and expanding linkages between water and energy -- The Watergy Nexus -- and will endeavor to provide a central clearinghouse for insightful articles and comments for all to consider.

Educated at Yale University (Bachelor of Arts - History) and Harvard (Master in Public Policy - International Development), Monty Simus has held a lifelong interest in environmental and conservation issues, primarily as they relate to freshwater scarcity, renewable energy, and national park policy.  Working from a water-scarce base in Las Vegas with his wife and son, he is the founder of Water Politics, an organization dedicated to the identification and analysis of geopolitical water issues arising from the world’s growing and vast water deficits, and is also a co-founder of SmartMarkets, an eco-preneurial venture that applies web 2.0 technology and online social networking innovations to motivate energy & water conservation.  He previously worked for an independent power producer in Central Asia; co-authored an article appearing in the Summer 2010 issue of the Tulane Environmental Law Journal, titled: “The Water Ethic: The Inexorable Birth Of A Certain Alienable Right”; and authored an article appearing in the inaugural issue of Johns Hopkins University's Global Water Magazine in July 2010 titled: “H2Own: The Water Ethic and an Equitable Market for the Exchange of Individual Water Efficiency Credits.”